The Fairy Wren – ebook is live!

tfw

Very happy to say that the ebook of The Fairy Wren is now available!

It’s been a bit of a hard slog but it’s now up on Amazon and a few other e-retailers, so if you’re looking for a contemporary fantasy about magical birds and frustrated bookstore owners, this is your chance to get it for $2.99 :D

It’s also still available in the more classic print form – but below is a list of e-retailers that have it up so far:

Available From
E-book – Amazon (US)
E-book – Amazon (UK)
E-Book – Amazon (AU)
E-Book – Booktopia (AU)
E-Book – Barnes&Noble (US)

Boneless

the notes pour me, boneless,
between the sheets
and I flick the light off,

sleep has become holy.
dreams stay just out of sight
and the slumber of the church bell
that has not been rung in years
is absolute.

brittle, teenage slang
floats through the night
and puts fear into the great,
conservative houses
who are most perfect at being still.

I set no alarm.

the white of hunting lights
from tennis courts
keeps part of the town awake
and the moon slinks away,
still unable to cough up
armstrong’s footprints

so I lie on my back, breathing
but not counting as each note
sinks me into the mattress
carefully,
like a countersunk man.

‘7 Years’ Available Now!

For a little while now I’ve been working with Ginninderra Press on a new release – it’s a small collection for their new series ‘Pocket Poets’ – which features slender chapbooks comprising around 20 poems, with each title featuring a single poet. My entry to the series (#37) is called 7 Years and is something of a mini ‘selected works’.

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For 7 Years I drew out a handful of poems from each of my preexisting collections and included a few uncollected pieces at the end too. It was enormous fun to put together! I love the idea of the Pocket Poets, it’s a great way to sample the work of a poet at an ace price and the neat ‘regular’ envelope size makes it so easy to ship!

7yearsPP

Once again, I’d like to thank Stephen and also Brenda for being so fantastic to work with and putting together a great release!

7 Years (and a lot of other great pocket poet titles) is available for $4 via Paypal at the Ginninderra website or by contacting me right here :)

The Tintin 2015 Reading Challenge: The Blue Lotus

Continuing my 2015 Tintin reading challenge tonight with The Blue Lotus. Earlier in the month I read Cigars of the Pharaoh and the storyline from that volume actually wraps up here.

The Blue Lotus is a special one for a few reasons, it’s got a pretty fantastic cover and some wonderful large panels, especially when entering towns, and perhaps most important to the history of Tintin, the introduction of Chang – who becomes vital to a future adventure.

#5 - (1936)

#5 – (1936)

Another twisty tale with some great double-bluffs, perhaps the most impressive thing about this one is the changes Herge makes to his research. The setting is much more accurately rendered in terms of dress and backdrops, characters on banners etc and a more balance view on race – where Tintin even discusses cultural misconceptions with his new friend Chang.

Thomson & Thompson return with one of their best single panels – where they attempt to blend into the streets of Shanghai with predictable results. I also loved hearing Thompson (or Thomson?) using the word ‘botheration.’ Fantastic.

There’s also some more instances of Herge’s fondness for alliteration (‘seventy-seven suffering samurais’) and some great night panels which always remind me of the ‘day for night’ shooting used in the older films (such as Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief.)

Another great adventure!

Next up: The Broken Ear.

fourW 25 & Writ. Poetry Review

Recently I’ve had a couple of poems appear in two great Australian publications – fourW and Writ. Poetry Review, both jam-packed full of great poetry!

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You can read my poem destined for mud in issue 2 of Writ. Poetry Review, who have what I feel is hands down the best presented online poetry publication I’ve come across in ages. Check it out and see if you agree, I really like the ’tiles’ page. In the issue too, is a heap of other great poets, many of whom I’m proud to call friends (or at the very least co-conspirators in poetry), check out poems by Mark William Jackson, Stuart Barnes, Michele Seminara, Robbie Coburn and Stu Hatton to name but a few!

Subs are open right now for the next issue – you can check out the details right here.

fourW-25-Cover-Image

fourW is celebrating their 25th issue, which is an awesome milestone in and of itself, but it’s also another fantastic one aside from that and I’m particularly happy to be in the journal again this year (check out Tiggy Johnson’s awesome piece in it!)

In fact, I’m especially honoured because editor David Gilbey and the selection panel published each pale song which is a long poem – something rare for me – and what makes their choice of a long poem noteworthy is that for me to have each pale song in the issue, you could say I effectively block two other (single page) poems from appearing in fourW. And I’ve no doubt the editors would have had more great material than they could fit in to #25.

So to publish my three page poem is a great vote of confidence and I really appreciate it!

 

The Tintin 2015 Reading Challenge: Cigars of the Pharaoh

So, a while back I decided to read all the Tintin books in 2015, which I’m really looking forward to. The challenge itself is pretty simple – I have to read about 2 a month. What might take a bit of time will be tracking down the first few and the last one. (The others I have on the shelf :) )

And being as it’s 2015 now, I’m kicking off with one of the earliest Tintin’s I remember reading as a kid – Cigars of the Pharaoh. (I’ll read in chronological order from here, looping back to the first Tintin in December.)

The_Adventures_of_Tintin_-_04_-_Cigars_of_the_Pharaoh

#4 – (1934)

Still one of my favourites, Cigars of the Pharaoh feels like ‘classic’ Tintin, even if it’s only the fourth release in the series and a lot of aspects to Herge’s Tintin-universe were still being developed.

It’s got a heap of action and the twists are piled on, there’s great word play from Thomson & Thompson (who make their first appearance) and the bounds of reality are amusingly stretched when Tintin carves a trumpet and learns the language of elephants. There’s also plot lines that run into the next volume and Snowy’s asides are great – and as ever, I love the ‘clear line’ style and the expressiveness of those few lines. There’s a panel where Snowy thinks Tintin has been killed and the despair on his poor face is drawn so well!

Easily one of the best Tintin adventures in my book.

Next up: The Blue Lotus.